Install Theme

" A description of Zaira as it is today should contain all Zaira’s past. The city, however, does not tell its past, but contains it like the lines of a hand, written in the corners of the streets, the gratings of the windows, the banisters of the steps, the antennae of the lightning rods, the poles of the flags, every segment marked in turn with scratches, indentations, scrolls. "

- Italo Calvino, Invisible Cities

This article from the Washington Post illustrates the use of the “time capsule” as officially sanctioned memory object: “In classic political fashion, there’s usually a burial ceremony, with plenty of public attention. But after a few years, the capsules are easy to forget about. Even the National Archives couldn’t immediately tell us where the popular time capsule created in 2000 for the new millennium is actually located. But maybe that’s the point. When the capsules are finally opened, it makes for a bigger reveal.”

Analogue video still

(Source: vhspositive)

Analogue video still

(Source: vhspositive)

(Source: windows95tips)

Monique Miggelbrink: “One possible method for considering the complex relationship between content and form in contemporary television dramas may be drawn from a 1988 article in The American Historical Review in which Hayden White discussed the relationship between history in words—’historiography’—and history in images—’historiophoty’. White asserts that both forms are not simply marked by difference, as it is often assumed by historians, but are unified in the basic fact that neither can ever depict historical events objectively. Every medium shapes its content according to its own nature, no matter if it speaks the language of the written word or the filmic image. Concerning Mad Men, one has to consider its visualization of history and, perhaps even more importantly, its serialization of history as its message. Telling history through the modes of seriality and narrative complexity establishes a deepened narrative scope that is not driven by linearity and closure, but provides space for historical complexity.” (via Serializing the Past: Re-Evaluating History in Mad Men | InVisible Culture)

Analogue video still

(Source: sofachips, via vhspositive)

Ghostly gifs made from archive photos – the haunting work of Kevin Weir.
The New York-based designer’s animation project The Flux Machine transforms old images into surreal stories, giving the dead an eerie afterlife (via Ghostly gifs made from archive photos – the haunting work of Kevin Weir | Art and design | The Guardian)

" Counter-memory is a way of remembering and forgetting that starts with the local, the immediate, and the personal. Unlike historical narratives that begin with the totality of human existence and then locate specific actions and events within that totality, counter-memory starts with the particular and the specific and then builds outwards toward a total story. Counter-memory looks to the past for the hidden histories excluded from dominant narratives. But unlike myths that seek to detach events and actions from the fabric of any larger history, counter-memory forces revision of existing histories by supplying new perspectives about the past. "

- George Lipsitz, 1990 (via memoryandmedia)

Using children’s modelling dough to recreate famous photographs, Eleanor Macnair’s colourful portraits provide a playful twist on well-known masterpieces. ‘I had no idea,’ she says, ‘that Play-Doh could emote’. (via Posed in Play-Doh - in pictures | Art and design | The Guardian)