Vintage pictures shared online by accounts such as Retronaut, HistoryInPix and IndiaHistoryPic capture moments gone for ever, but as vividly as the here-and-now. It’s a heady mix of nostalgia and history (via 'Retronauting': why we can't stop sharing old photographs | Art and design | The Guardian)

1 04.14.14
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"The city, however, does not tell its past, but contains it like the lines of a hand, written in the corners of the streets, the gratings of the windows, the bannisters of the steps, the antennae of the lightening rods, the poles of the flags, every segment marked in turn with scratches, indentations, scrolls."
— Italo Calvino, Invisible Cities (Harcourt, 1972, p. 11)

(Source: urbangeographies, via jkalin)

41 04.13.14
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Gene Tierney and Dana Andrews in Laura (Otto Preminger, 1944).

8 01.27.14
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The Matter of Memory is an ongoing work that investigates the relationship between memory and place. This smart-phone application can make an audio recording tied to a specific location. When the user is about to record, they are presented with the question, “Why is this place important to you?” Once the recording is uploaded, users must be within 100 feet of the place where it was recorded to be able to listen to it. (via The Matter of Memory)

10.22.13
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jkalin:

The following is excerpted from Clive Thompson’s book Smarter Than You Think: How Technology Is Changing Our Minds for the Better, out now from the Penguin Press. Is the Internet ruining our ability to remember facts? If you’ve ever lunged for your smartphone during a bar argument (“one-hit father of twerking pop star”—Billy Ray Cyrus!), then you’ve no doubt felt the nagging fear that your in-brain memory is slowly draining away. As even more fiendishly powerful search tools emerge—from IBM’s Jeopardy!-playing Watson to the “predictive search” of Google Now—these worries are, let’s face it, only going to grow. So what’s going on? Each time we reach for the mouse pad when we space out on the ingredients for a Tom Collins or the capital of Arkansas, are we losing the power to retain knowledge? The short answer is: No. Machines aren’t ruining our memory. The longer answer: It’s much, much weirder than that! (via Are search engines and the Internet hurting human memory? - Slate Magazine)

1 09.23.13
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jkalin:

Portraits represented an ideal. It’s easy to mock them — they were the profile pictures of the aristocracy, in a sort of way — but they were crucial, tied to mortality, a method of preserving a person’s visage and affect. Jeeves puts it well: “The ambition [with portraiture] was not to capture a moment, but a moral certainty.” Subjects never looked exactly like their picture, yet their portraits were how they appeared. Portraits had permanence. You did not want to commit a permanent faux pas. (via Why Didn’t People Smile in Old Portraits? - Robinson Meyer - The Atlantic)

1 09.23.13
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Time, mortality and memory: artists and writers on the power of photography. (via The power of photography: time, mortality and memory | Art and design | The Guardian)

05.20.13
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(Source: modrules)

12866 05.09.13
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"Austrian photographer Reiner Riedler’s new project, the appropriately titled The Unseen Seen is a series of macro shots of original filmrolls. Having gained access to The Deutsche Kinemathek, Berlin museum and film archive—home to 13,000 national and international film titles—Riedler selected a mix of well-known cult classics and lesser known films to photograph. He set up a makeshift studio in the archive, using film lights to backlight the filmrolls, lighting each one in the same way for continuity. Alone the images present an interesting graphic visual, but Riedler hopes that coupled with the film titles they will rouse the viewer’s unique associations with the film.” (via Macro Photos of Filmrolls Present a New Way of Seeing The Godfather, Scarface and Citizen Kane | Feature Shoot)

1 04.25.13
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Fukushima town revealed in Google Street View two years after tsunami - Mayor of Namie invites Google’s cameras in to stop world forgetting twin disasters of tsunami then nuclear meltdown (via Fukushima town revealed in Google Street View two years after tsunami | Environment | The Guardian)

03.28.13
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